Paid, Owned, Earned Media: Are You in the Right Place?

 

You may have heard the terms "paid, owned, earned media" bandied about recently and been curious. You want to know more—understanding where and how your communication appears is as critical for those committed to social change as it is for major brand managers. eMarketer is a helpful start: "paid media is advertising inserted next to another’s content; owned media is brand-created content; and earned media is getting someone else to provide content about a brand." But these definitions are blurry in practice and not everyone is using them in the same way. It seems it's time for this marketer to share my view of how to use the paid, owned, earned media framework for your marketing strategy.

Posted by Pat Heffernan on 5/18/17 12:00 PM

Why You Want Both Advertising AND Conversation

 

Ok, I’m a big fan of advertising. When used correctly advertising is a good way to promote your brand, service, or product. But advertising can’t do it all. 

This is the age of always-connected, ever-searching, information at your fingertips. Companies (and yes, nonprofits too) need to do more than just throw messages out there. You need to engage your prospects, clients, and influential audiences in active conversation. Content marketing is what you need.

Posted by Dave Bowers on 8/25/16 11:00 AM

Top Secret: You Get Results with Strategic Advertising

 

Advertising works. Businesses get results with strategic advertising. Why else would so many businesses spend so much money if it didn’t? And big businesses have the proof it works. They track everything from views, clicks, calls, mentions (social media), and especially sales. Using this data, advertising messages and channels are honed, tuned, tested, retested, and refined.

Posted by Dave Bowers on 7/28/16 11:00 AM

Change Convos monthly top picks: 5 links we loved in April

 

April showers found us seeking a higher proportion of fresh, new and fun links than our usual mix of substantive fodder for serious thinkers and change makers. Here, ICYMI, are our top picks from what we were reading (and watching) in April.

 

Posted by Pat Heffernan on 5/5/16 10:00 AM

Promotional Item or Landfill?

 

In 2014, promotional products were a $20 billion dollar industry, branding everything from award plaques to watches. By dollar volume of sales, wearables and writing instruments are the largest categories. Most companies use promotional items at some time, and your strategy is important because promotional items will represent your brand.

Posted by Dave Bowers on 2/25/16 3:00 PM

Is Sponsored Content Good for Values-Led Business?

Are you thinking like I’m thinking that it is getting murky out there? My fog meter is registering an increase in befuddling language about sponsored content (aka native advertising), which makes it unnecessarily difficult to evaluate your options. Major traditional publishers such as The New York Times, the Atlantic, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and the New Yorker have joined Business Insider and Forbes so now each offers sponsored content in some form. Seems like it is time to revisit the basics and the latest guidelines for paid media for values-led businesses.

Posted by Pat Heffernan on 3/9/15 10:22 AM

How to Find Your Customers in the Social Media Space

Three years after my first look at the question of where to find your customers in social media, I have a pleasant surprise for you: There is good news on this front. While changes made by social media networks and service providers often disrupt marketers, causing small nonprofits and businesses lots of extra work with little benefit, that’s not the story this time. It is easier and more affordable now then ever before for change marketers to identify where current customers, friends and prospects can be found in social media.

Posted by Pat Heffernan on 7/29/13 12:59 PM

Nielsen Challenging Consumer Segment Age Biases: Crazy?

Nielsen, one of the advertising industry’s oldest and most respected research companies, is taking consumer marketers to task by challenging them (and us) to rethink the old belief that marketing to those 50 and older is a waste of ad dollars. This probably seems absurd to many advertising firms, after all, the 18 to 49 year old audience segment has always been the gold standard, the dollar sign — the moneymaker! But now, with the youngest Baby Boomers just over 50, advertisers have to consider the sheer number of them, 78 million, in a fast-paced technology-based world.

Posted by Nicole Twohig on 7/22/10 10:02 AM